Looking To Save Time When Blogging? Here Are 5 Things That Worked For Me

In my recent post, ‘Why Are Some Bloggers Killing Off Comments Being left On Their Blogs?‘ the most popular reason was – ‘they didn’t have the time to respond to them.’

Do you ever find yourself running out of time when blogging?

Blog post banner for the blog post 'Looking To Save Time When Blogging? Here Are 5 Things That Worked For Me.'
Looking To Save Time When Blogging?

It’s something that used to happen to me. After getting out of bed, I’d sit down in front of the computer and, before I knew it, the time had flown past! I’d feel as if I hadn’t achieved anything.

Many bloggers say that blogging can be very time-consuming. Your work-in-progress will look as if it’s never going to get finished, your laundry basket is overflowing, the house is a mess, and family and friends will start wondering who you are because you seldom join in anymore.

Here are five tips that I implemented to save me time when blogging.

1. Save time by stopping feeling guilty or stressed out about blogging.

I wanted to be everywhere in both the worlds of blogging and social media.

Every time I followed a blog or got a new follower on Twitter, I felt it my duty to read, like and comment on every blog post and tweet of every blog I followed. I felt guilty if I didn’t leave a comment. Can you imagine how much time I was spending reading and leaving comments on those blogs?

At first, that wasn’t so much of a problem (when I only followed a handful of blogs), but I found myself often reading and commenting on posts just for the sake of it. Even if the content didn’t interest me, I still felt I had a duty to read and comment. 

I acted like one of those hamsters running around on its wheel as I tried to get to the top of my WordPress Reader list. I’d spent my days reading and commenting, leaving me little time to do anything else, such as writing!

While some of the bloggers I’d left comments for came back and commented on some of my blog posts, my posts were suffering because I’d rushed them, not put any serious thought into them and published them on the same day I’d written them. Big mistake! I was producing poor quality content.

Unless they’re only following a handful of blogs, nobody can read and comment on every blog post of all the blogs they follow. Don’t feel that you have to read and comment on every single newly published blog post. A loyal, friendly blogger won’t mind if you miss or don’t comment on some of their posts. If they do care, or take offence, maybe it’s time to think about unfollowing them?

Save yourself time by only reading and following blogs that interest you. 

2. Save time by finding out what your ‘high peak’ blogging times are.

What do I mean by ‘high peak’ blogging times? They are the times of the day and the days of the week when you feel that the blogging world is at its busiest for you.

As soon as you have been blogging for a few months, you should start to see when your ‘high peak’ blogging times are. 

If, like me, you start by publishing on different days and times, you’ll soon get a feel for when your ‘high peak’ blogging times are.   

My ‘high peak’ blogging times are –

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 12:00 – 17:00 (GMT).

These are the days and times when I feel the blogging world is at its busiest. I have more interaction with other bloggers during these times. 

However, let’s say that you only publish blog posts on a Saturday at midday. As your audience grows, they’ll soon get used to when you publish posts, so they’ll expect to see new content from you on that day and time. That will be your ‘high peak’ blogging time. 

If you work during the week, you and others may only publish posts and read and comment on other posts during the weekends. Therefore, your ‘high peak’ blogging times will be Saturdays and Sundays.

It took me a while to find my ‘high peak’ blogging times, and they can change.

Now, during ‘low peak’ blogging times, I’m not likely to be blogging very much, although I will respond to any outstanding comments. I use most of the time to get on with other things.

I may also use the time to write blogging posts.

Finding out my ‘high peak’ blogging times helped me cut down my online presence and helped me save time.  

3. Get Yourself A Blogging Routine.

Once you know what your peak blogging times and days are, plan a blogging routine around them. For me, I always begin the mornings by responding to comments left on my posts and those posts where I’ve commented.

Depending on the number of comments your blog gets, this can take up a lot of time. As I’m in my most creative mood in the mornings, if there are too many comments to respond to, then I’ll write first and come back later and respond.

When responding to comments, I’ve implemented the following time-saving rules.

  • I take conversations offline if anyone leaves a comment that has nothing to do with the post’s subject. 
  • If a blog post attracts lots of comments, I delay the publication of my next post (as I did with this post) until comments are at a level at which I can respond to them comfortably without feeling overwhelmed. However, if you run a weekly or monthly challenge, this may not be possible to do. 

My previous blogging tips post, ‘Why Are Some Bloggers Killing Off Comments Being left On Their Blogs?‘ produced lots of comments, so delaying the publishing date of this post helped me save time by not getting overwhelmed with more comments.   

  • I stopped publishing new blog posts just before going offline for a few days (such as going away on holiday). I also stopped publishing blog posts while on holiday. It means I don’t come back to an overflowing comments box that needs my urgent attention.
  • I close off comments on any reblogs I do, requesting that readers leave new comments on the original post. 
  • I close comments off on my Throwback Thursday and Flashback Friday posts, requesting that readers leave any new comments on the original post. 
  • Rather than respond to ‘lazy’ comments, I acknowledge them with a ‘like,’     

All have helped me save time when responding to comments.  

I give myself blogging breaks during the day but always stop blogging after 17:00. Occasionally, I will respond to comments during the evenings, but this is very rare. 

I recently decided to stop blogging at weekends because that’s when the blogging world seems to be much quieter for me.

Set yourself a ‘switch-off blogging’ time, and stick to it. 

4. WordPress Reader or Email Notifications?

Because I compared myself earlier to a hamster running on a wheel, I seldom use the WordPress Reader anymore. Instead, I receive notifications of new blog posts by email.

I have created a folder in my email box and named it ‘Must Read.’ I move all the posts with eye-catching titles and which I want to read to that folder. The rest get deleted. It stops my email box from looking like it’s been on a bodybuilding course which, in turn, prevents me from stressing out about there being too many unopened emails in my inbox.

I no longer feel guilty about deleting emails of blog posts I’ve not read or those that have unappealing titles.  

I do like leaving comments, but I no longer allow myself to waste time thinking of something valuable to say. If I can’t think of something that adds value straight away, I may leave a ‘like’ before moving on to the next post. It helps take away the guilt and stress feelings that spoilt blogging for me. Plus, it ‘s saving me time. 

5. Follow For A Follow

Don’t fall into the trap of following every single blogger who follows you, especially those that follow you, without leaving a comment.

Unfortunately, not only will some of these bloggers unfollow you as soon you follow them, but there’s no simple way (as far as I’m aware) of finding out whether they have unfollowed you or not. 

All those bloggers want are as many followers as possible – often without visiting and interacting with any of the blogs they follow. Stats drive them more than content does.

By all means, do check out some of the blogs of the bloggers who have followed you but never feel obliged to follow them back. Only follow the blogs that publish content of interest to you, especially if they are likely to get you leaving helpful valuable comments.

Let’s wrap it up

  • Stressing out or feeling guilty about blogging won’t save you time. All it will do is make blogging less appealing.
  • Save time by not following and reading blogs that do not interest you.
  • Never think that you have to read and leave a comment on every newly published blog post.
  • Find out what your ‘high peak’ blogging times are.
  • ‘High Peak’ blogging times are the times you feel are the busiest for you and often when you interact the most with other bloggers and readers.
  • Use ‘low peak’ blogging times to write or do other stuff.
  • Get yourself a blogging routine and stick to it.
  • Think and implement ways of saving yourself time when answering comments.
  • Set yourself a ‘switch-off blogging’ time, and stick to it.
  • If you’re spending too much time trying to get to the top of your WordPress Reader, consider getting new blog post notifications via email.
  • Move the new post notifications that have appealing blog post titles to a ‘Must Read’ folder.
  • Delete the new post notifications that have unappealing blog posts titles. Never feel guilty about deleting them.
  • Don’t fall into the trap of following every single blogger who follows you.
  • Some bloggers will unfollow you as soon as you follow them back.
  • By all means, check out some of the blogs that follow you, but only follow those that publish interesting content you know will make you want to join in with the conversations by leaving comments.

What do you do to save time when blogging? Share your blogging time-saving tips in the comments section and help those bloggers who are always finding themselves running out of time when blogging.

Looking for more blogging tips? Check out these posts.

Why Are Some Bloggers Killing Off Comments Being Left On Their Blogs?

Have you ever considered turning off comments on your blog?

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Author: Hugh W. Roberts

My name is Hugh. I live in the city of Swansea, South Wales, in the United Kingdom. My blog covers a wide range of subjects, the most popular of which are my blogging tips posts. If you have any questions about blogging or anything else, please contact me by clicking on the 'Contact Hugh' button on the menu bar. Click on the 'Meet Hugh' button on the menu bar of my blog to learn more about me and my blog.

110 thoughts

  1. Thank you so much for putting this out there, i have felt guilty for feeling like I’m not doing enough as a new blogger in terms of building up a better following. It can be a lot of time to dedicate to reading many blogs but i am going to follow your advice about just reading ones that interest you. It makes much better sense!

    1. I only wish I had taken my own advice when I first started blogging. I’ve witnessed many bloggers feel guilty for not keeping up with reading and commenting on every blog they follow, some of which did not interest them. Just about all of them stopped blogging. It makes a lot of sense to only read what interests you. After all, we only read books and watch movies that interest us, so why not do the same with blogging too?

  2. Very profound, thank you for all the tips. I’ve found that when I try to perfect it too much, that when it all gets too time consuming. Instead of trying a create perfect post, it may be better to publish and the update it as time goes on. I’ve still got loads to learn, thank you for these Insightful tips.

  3. Hi Hugh,
    You accurately describe the “hamster wheel” I’m on daily! I prioritize the blogging tasks but replying to comments always seems to end up at the bottom of the list and don’t get accomplished. I feel guilt as a result!
    Janice

  4. These are helpful. It’s a hard balance–blogging is by nature interactive, but I’ve had the same experience you described of spending hours reading and commenting on other’s blogs. I realized that only a couple of bloggers comment on most of my posts, so I didn’t need to feel like I had to respond to all the bloggers I followed. And I stopped commenting just to comment if I couldn’t think of something valuable to say.

    1. I’m glad to hear your last point, Barbara. Too many bloggers get so worked up about feeling they are obliged to read and leave comments on every blog they read. Many often say they feel guilty for not doing so. It should never be like that. I say read and leave comments when you can, not because you feel you have to.

  5. This is such a reflective post on managing your time with blogging, and making sure you don’t spend too much time on blogging. Like you, I used to feel guilty if I didn’t read or comment on every single post by bloggers that I followed. It really took up so much of my time, so much so that it left me drained – so much so I didn’t even want to write my own blog posts. As bloggers we also wear different hats in the offline world and we have many priorities. These days I set aside time, such a few weeks here and there, to catch up on posts that I feel attracted to and compelled to read.

    You said it very well, ‘A loyal, friendly blogger won’t mind if you miss or don’t comment on some of their posts.’ It is sort of like your closest friends: you catch up with each other when you can, and you make these catch-ups, no matter how occasional, intentional and meaningful. That’s how I approach reading and commenting on blogs these days. And likewise I don’t hold a grudge when bloggers I follow don’t comment on every single one of my posts.

    Personally I use the WordPress reader to keep up with blogs I follow and blog posts. I allocate more time to read and comment on blogs once every month or every few weeks, giving time to each blogger. Thanks for anther thoughtful post, Hugh.

    1. I’m glad you shared how you felt when reading and commenting on blog posts, Mabel. It’s a horrible position to be in and takes all the fun and enjoyment out of blogging. It’s one of the reasons why I stopped feeling obliged to read and leave comments on certain blogs. And many of those comments I was leaving had no value whatsoever. All they were doing were saying, ‘I’m here.’ Did anyone actually care?

      I think the majority of bloggers are like you and me and don’t mind in the least if we miss certain blog posts and don’t read and leave comments on all of them. Yet it seems many bloggers feel they must do just that and read and leave a comment, usually while under a lot of pressure. I’ve seen many good writers and bloggers abandon their blogs because of it. It’s such a shame it happens.

      Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts and joining the discussion on this subject, Mabel.

      1. I definitely agree, it’s a horrible position to be in to be commenting on every single blog post and it consumes all of your time. The last thing I want to do is leave a half-hearted comment on someone’s blog. Hopefully more bloggers get to manage their time here in the blogging sphere, and also offline. Again, thanks for another great write up.

  6. I’m a new blogger and you’ve helped put my mind at ease a bit. I do feel really bad when I don’t interact with EVERY SINGLE PERSON but you’re right we’re all human, and we all have stuff to do! Thank you!

    1. I’m so pleased to hear that this post has helped put your mind at ease. However, remember to always interact with those that leave comments on your blog, especially the comments that prove they have read your post. You can respond to ‘lazy’ comments, such as ‘great post’ by clicking ‘like’ to the comment.

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