What To Do If You Find Any Of These 7 Scary Things In The World Of Blogging

Sometimes, the world of blogging can seem like a terrifying place.

With pitfalls, slippery slops to guilt, stress and bloggers’ burnout to avoid, it can make any blogger want to make a hasty retreat.

Fear not! I am here to help you avoid and overcome 7 scary things you may come across in today’s blogging world. 

Trolls

I’ve had my fair share of visits from internet trolls. They get a lot of enjoyment from spreading their venom around the world of blogging. 

Not only have the trolls aimed their nasty comments at me, but they also try and trick other commentators into getting into a battle with them.

After an incident which involved a troll attacking another blogger within the comments section on one of my posts, I switched to moderating all comments.

It’s a simple process to set up on any WordPress Blog. 

  • In the lefthand menu of the dashboard\admin centre of your blog, under ‘Manage’, click on ‘Settings.’ 
  • A new menu will open. In the top menu, click on ‘Discussion‘. 
  • In the new menu that opens, look for the ‘Before Comments Appears’ section, and turn on ‘Comment must be manually approved.’ 
  • Click ‘Save Settings‘.
  • If you’re happy to allow comments from those who have commented before to appear without any moderation from yourself, turn on ‘Comment author must have a previously approved comment.’ 

However, be aware that there’s always a chance that a friendly blogger can suddenly turn into a troll. I’m talking from experience here. Yes, it happened on my blog when somebody who had left lots of seemingly lovely comments suddenly turned into a troll and personally attacked another blogger. 

The best way you can deal with trolls is to never respond to their comments.

Mark the offending comment as spam, and mark any further comments from them the same way. Once you do so, WordPress will soon get used to sending all comments from the troll to your WordPress spam folder. 

#night #photography #SundayStills
Trolls can come in all shapes and sizes

Tags and Categories

I’ve seen many bloggers become terrified when it comes to using tags and categories on their blog posts. 

They start to panic when deciding what keywords to use as tags.

Some even go as far as using keywords that have nothing to do with the post they’ve just written. 

The best tags to use are one or two words long. For example, if you’re tagging a blog post for a recipe for chocolate chip cookies, use tags such as baking, bake, cookery, food, ingredients, cookies, chocolate biscuits, etc.

When somebody does a search on WordPress for keywords that you have as tags, your blog post will appear in the search results.

Here are some recent results my blog has had form searches done by readers on WordPress.

Pitfall alert – never use more than 15 tags on your blog posts. Why? Because blog posts containing more than 15 tags do not appear on the WordPress Reader. Click here for more details. 

Not categorising your blog posts is like throwing your post onto the top of a colossal mishmash pile that nobody is going to want to try and wade through.

Always categorise your blog posts. Not sure how? Click here to find out.

What’s the most terrifying category any blogger can use?

Uncategorised.’ 😱

No audience

When I first started to blog, I was terrified that nobody was going to read any of my blog posts. I visioned myself on a stage in front of a large theatre full of empty seats.

Image by Deedee86 from Pixabay

That’s how it begins for many bloggers, but there are ways to start filling up your blogging theatre.

  • Leave good meaningful comments that add value on the blog posts of other bloggers.
  • Participate in blogging challenges such as Sunday StillsWritePhoto, Thursday Doors, or Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry challenge.
  • Participate in a blog party where you can meet other bloggers. Click here to join Janice Wald’s Halloween Blog Party. I’ve already visited.
  • Look for opportunities to write guest posts for other bloggers.
  • Open up the opportunity for other bloggers to write guest posts for your blog.
  • Ensure you promote your blog and blog posts on all your social media accounts.

This blog post is my entry for this week’s Sunday Stills challenge which has the theme of ‘Something Scary’. Click here to join the challenge.

Once you start to become part of blogging communities, people will come and visit your blog. Not all will follow you back, but interaction with other bloggers is a great way to start building a readership. 

Before you know it, the seats in your blogging theatre will start filling up.  

Social Media

I was lucky in that I had already encountered the frightening world of social media when I started to blog. However, I still hear about so many bloggers who say how terrified they are of it. 

Photo by Corey Sitkowski on Pexels.com

Yes, social media can seem like a big, evil monster, but the trick is not to spread yourself too thinly by thinking you have to have an account on all social media platforms. 

If you allow it, social media will take up a lot of your time. It does need some hard work and dedication for it to work correctly, but limit yourself to two or three social media accounts at the most.

Begin by trying some of them out. You’ll soon discover which ones work best for you. 

For me, Twitter brings in a lot of traffic to my blog. It now has a new look, which I love, and I enjoy interacting with other users on it.

It’s nothing as frightening as this scene from one my favourite scary movies.

Over the last month, I’ve increased the number of followers on Twitter by over 1,000. Much of that is down to interacting with other users on it (mainly other writers and bloggers).   

However, Twitter isn’t for everyone. I know some bloggers who prefer Pinterest, Facebook, Linkedin, to name but a few. 

Once you know which social media platforms you enjoy using the most, and which work best for you, remember to ensure you have sharing buttons on all your blog posts so that readers can share your posts on their social media platforms.

Click here to find out more about sharing buttons. 

Following Too Many Blogs

Not only do I occasionally get shocked by how many blogs I am following, but it can become a frightening prospect knowing that there is no way I’m ever going to be able to read all the blog posts of all those blogs I follow.

Following too many blogs can become overwhelming, especially if you receive notification of new posts via email. 

Every few months, for various reasons, I cut back on the number of blogs I follow.

Reasons for unfollowing can be anything from no longer finding blog posts interesting, no new content published for a longtime, unfollowing because a blogger does not reply to any comments.  

It’s easy to manage the blogs you follow. Here’s how to do it. 

  • Click on the ‘Reader‘ button located towards the top lefthand of your blog. 
  • Click on the “Manage‘ button on the screen.
  • You’ll then see a list of the blogs you are following. 
  • You can sort the list by ‘date followed’ or by ‘site name.’ 
  • Go through the list and decide which blogs to unfollow.
  • To unfollow a blog, click on the word ‘following‘ next to the blog you want to unfollow.
  • Once you’ve unfollowed a blog, the word ‘Follow‘ will show next to it. 
  • To refollow the blog, click on ‘Follow.’  

How easy was that? 😀 

The Spam Monster

Many bloggers have become a victim of the spam monster.

#monsters #scary #monster

When it captures you, all the comments you leave on other blogs go straight to spam. 

Worse still, is that you don’t know all your comments are going to spam until anther blogger tells you that they found your comment in their WordPress spam folder. 

I’ve been captured by the spam monster three times!

However, there is a way to escape the spam monster. Click here for the details. 

If you do find a genuine comment from another blogger in your WordPress spam folder, un-spam the comment and inform the blogger concerned. 

Who knows? They could have become the spam monster’s latest victim.      

The Gutenberg Editor

When I first tried using the new Gutenberg editor, I was soon transformed into a monster that has followed me for much of my life.

Image by Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

I only tried Gutenberg for five minutes but soon found myself turning into the ‘hate change’ monster.

Nothing was going to make me start using something that promised to change and improve the way I blogged or that promised to save me time when drafting new blog posts.

Then, during a particularly dark, dull day at the end of December 2018, I read some tutorials and watched some videos on how Gutenberg works. As December faded into January, I gave Gutenberg another try, only this time I gave it more of my time.

My blog posts suddenly took on a new look that made them more appealing, striking and impressive. Gutenberg was changing the way I blogged.

I soon started to save myself lots of time drafting blog posts as the benefits of using the Gutenberg editor began to pay off for the time I had given to learning how it works.

Almost a year on, not only do I consider the switch from using the classic editor to using the Gutenberg editor the best change I’ve ever made on my blogging journey, but I’m delighted that I never gave in to the ‘hate change’ monster.

Rather than allow things to happen, make things happen while you have the time.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

With WordPress having confirmed that the classic editor will be discontinued from 31st December 2021, don’t allow yourself to become a victim of the ‘hate change’ monster.

Set up a draft post on your blog where you can play with the Gutenberg editor. Even if you only play with it a few times a week, it’s better than being one of the many bloggers who are going to find themselves with no time to start trying it out before the classic editor is discontinued.

As author and blogger Colleen M. Chesebro said in one of her blog posts about using the Gutenberg editor –

it’s not hard to use; just different. 

Click here to read Colleen’s first post on the baiscs of using the Gutenberg editor.

Are there any scary things in the world of blogging that have you closing your eyes in the hope that they are not really there? How did/do you deal with them? Share the details in the comments section.

Copyright © 2019 hughsviewsandnews.com – All rights reserved.

142 comments

  1. Useful tips and some I hadn’t known I could do. I will look into those.
    With regards to ‘unfollowing’ though, I tend to go into ‘Settings’ first (under the ‘Unfollow’ button) and just stop getting alerted of every post. That way I can still run through those posts in my Reader from time to time in case the blogger posts another one I find useful – after all, there must have been a reason why I Followed in the first place.

    1. True, although I do give those that I follow a chance to publish something I know I will enjoy. As somebody who dislikes clutter, I don’t like my WordPress reader being cluttered up with blog posts I know I’m not probably going to enjoy. That way, it gives the blogs I follow and who publish more than once a day a chance of me catching one of their posts.

  2. Excellent advice and information, as always, and well-written and presented, Hugh. I’ve found that Word Press usually catches any trolls that attack my posts before I even know about it, which I appreciate. Thus, I rarely look at my Spam folder, but you have convinced me to go look there. Once, about a year ago, I was sending out comments to other bloggers and they weren’t being put in! I was frustrated. Then I asked a blogger if she knew I’d commented, and she found my comment in her Spam folder. I had been Spammed. I contacted WP and they unspammed me (and their reason for spamming me was that I had commented on too many blogs in an hour). But for me, I like to take an hour every few days to read blogs and make a comment. WP says I have to only do a few at a time. Interesting stuff.

    1. Thank you very much, Pam.

      I check my WordPress spam folder at least once a day and always inform people who have left a genuine comment if I find their comment in there. Most have no idea that it may be all their comments that are ending up in spam. Having happened to me three times, I always appreciate it when somebody tells me they found my comment in their spam folder. Fortunately, the spam monster has stayed away from me for the last couple of years.

      I did ask WordPress why my comments were all going to spam, but they could not give me an answer. I heard from another blogger that it happens when WordPress does a security update on their platform and that some bloggers comments are then all marked as spam. The reason they gave you sounds like a poor excuse, but at least they fixed it for you.

      1. I checked my Spam folder and was, ahem, rather shocked. No relevant person in there and some really yucky stuff. I also saw the button in which I could forever ‘block’ user, so I did that also.

  3. Excellent Halloween special on blogging Hugh. Lol, had to laugh at the ‘uncategorised’ section. It’s astounding how many keep that tag going strong, lol. Great tips as always – loved the spam tutorial too ❤ Happy Halloween! 🙂 x

    1. I see bloggers categorising posts as ‘uncategorised, almost every day, Debby. I think some must have it set up as the default category in their blog settings. It doesn’t help anyone not categorising a blog post. And even if you can’t think of how to categorise a blog post, anything is better than ‘uncategorised.’

      Happy Halloween.👻

      1. Hugh, I do believe ‘uncategorised’ is a default setting on WP. Astounding how some people don’t realize to untick it. And not only does it help others to search through out posts with tags – it helps US when WE are looking through our own posts for something particular. 🙂 x

  4. Hugh, these are very helpful hints and I especially appreciate the encouragement to use Gutenberg Editor. Thank you for sharing Colleen’s post. I am going to take her advice and set up an experimental ‘test blog.’ After three years of blogging, I have yet to scratch the surface of the behind the scenes tricks and tools, but I manage to figure out what I need, when I need it. Glad to know there are folks out here like you and Colleen to rely upon for advice. Excellent graphics and illustrations to support your text here. Thanks for making it all a bit less scary!

    1. Thank you, I’m glad this post has helped, Suzanne. I also like to include screenshots, as I really think they help readers. Otherwise, readers may give up on what I’m trying to explain.

      Setting up a test blog is an excellent idea from Colleen. The Gutenberg editor does have some faults with it (mainly the picture gallery blocks), but I know that WordPress is always trying to improve features. Just yesterday, I was amazed by how many new blocks they’d introduced. There’s a lot more for me to explore.

  5. Great points, Hugh! My biggest problem with blogging and social media is the time suck. In a way, I miss the times when I had my sailing blog, It’s Irie, and there would be no “pressure” when to write and no “obligation” to follow people back, read their blogs, and leave comments. Of course, the times have changed (I had my other adventure blog from 2007 – 2015) and with it, the community (and expectations) as well. On the other hand, I LOVE the blogging community and the friends I’ve made through it.

    I was just thinking about writing a post “Is social media toxic?” reflecting on what social media means to me or how it has affected me. I think we should all not only restrict ourselves to social media forms, but also to the time we spend on it.

    After using Gutenberg for a while now, I still don’t like it. My issue is the way it deals with photos and photo collages, for which I have to keep using the classic editor to make it look the way I want. I should look into it all again, in case they’ve changed things for the best in regards to photos.

    1. I agree with what you say about social media, Liesbet. I’ve heard stories of cyberbullying through it and even users who go on to end their own lives. It’s become a monster of the 21st century, although I also know of many people who get a lot of benefit from it. I restrict the time I spend on it (and on my blog), but you do have to have the will power to keep to it. So far, so good for me. I manage to fight off the urges I sometimes get to check my phone or computer when I know I’ve gone past ‘switch-off’ time.

      Is it just the photo gallery options you don’t like on Gutenberg, or is there anything else? I must admit that after playing around with some of the gallery blocks yesterday, I saw at how poor they are. Fortunately, for me, I don’t use any galleries on my blog posts. I tend to use just single images (which I think the image block works well). Of course, there is the option of using the Classic Block for galleries. What I’m not sure about is whether WordPress plan to delete that block when they switch off the classic editor for good in 2021.

      1. Yes, it’s just the galleries I don’t like in Gutenberg, Hugh. The single photos worked fine, I believe. And, you’ve proven that they look good. It was you who told me about the ability to use the classic editor for just my photo collages way back when, which was a brilliant idea. It’s what I’ve been doing since the beginning of using Gutenberg – blocks for the text and “old style” for my photos. WordPress will probably get rid of this as well, but I hope by then, that they’ve come up with a brilliant replacement. 🙂

  6. I’ve been lucky not be trolled – though I dare say it could still happen. I noticed in the comments about reciving invitations to follow a blog. I’ve had a couple of emails inviting me to follow a blog, which I’ve ignored but have no idea how they came about.

    1. I wonder how they got your email address to send you an invitation to follow their blog, Mary? I know that when somebody leaves a comment on a blog post, the author of the post can see the email address of the person leaving the comment, but if they’ve never left a comment, how do they get it? Maybe WordPress has a feature that allows bloggers to send out invitations? If I do get one, I’ll approach WordPress to find out how it was done and how any future emails of that kind can be blocked.

  7. So much good advice here, Hugh. I was intrigued to see your screenshot of some of the blogs you follow, as I received an email from WordPress the other day, with an invitation from one of those bloggers to follow him. As far as I recall I’ve never had any post likes or comments from him, so I ignored the invitation, though I did first take a look at his site. But I can’t think of a better way of deterring potential followers than making random invitations with no prior connection!

    1. I had no idea that bloggers could invite other bloggers to follow them, Clive. I’ve certainly never had an invitation to follow another blogger, although WordPress does recommend some blogs to me to follow when I’m on the ‘Manage’ page of my blog’s dashboard. I usually just ignore their recommendations. I prefer, instead, to do a search for content that I know I will enjoy. If I then like the blog, I’ll usually then follow it.

      There are some blogs I do follow because I enjoy their content, even though they don’t follow me back. I don’t mind that at all, as I know that not everyone is going to enjoy the content, I publish.

      1. I had no idea either, until that invitation arrived. It isn’t something I’d do: I would rather let people find my blog by what I regard as more ‘normal’ routes. I tend to ignore those recommendations too, as most of them are not really relevant to me and I already follow plenty of blogs! Like you, I follow those that interest me but am not worried if they don’t follow back. Nor do I follow everyone who follows me.

  8. I’m still terrified to try the gutenberg Hugh. Once book two is finished I better tackle that next. Great post as always. Thanks for the link to Janice’s halloween party. You know how I love halloween!

    1. I was precisely the same, Marje – terrified of trying it out. Now, I don’t know why I ever thought it would be so terrifying. As Colleen said to her readers – it’s not hard to use, just different. The upcoming blogging lull in December would be the perfect time to give it a try. Don’t get left behind when the Classic editor is withdrawn. There are still two years, but you know how much time can fly.

      Happy Halloween. 🎃

  9. Hi, Hugh – Like Janis, I frequently recommend your site to new bloggers (and to experienced bloggers wishing new blogging tips). Your suggestions are always spot on. Thank you for the reminders – I am off to check my ‘Manage Sites’ right now!

  10. Hi Hugh,
    Your blogging tips are SO helpful. You are truly doing a great service to the blogging community with your blogging tips posts. Each one seems better than the last which is a pretty tough feat.
    Thanks for mentioning my Halloween blog party to your readers. Everyone is welcome!
    Off to share!
    Janice

    1. Thank you so much, Janice. That is high praise, indeed, coming from a blogging expert like you. I enjoy writing and sharing these kinds of blog posts. However, I’m still learning.

      I hope your Halloween blog party is a huge success.

      Thank you for sharing this post.

      Best wishes,
      Hugh

  11. Fantastic post again. For sure, you speak to many of us here with everything you mention. Thank God, there were only 2 to 3 trolls finding my blog yet. But they were banned quickly… lol! When I followed too many blogs (or those I followed posted to often) I turned off the email notifications on most of the blogs I follow and only go through the reader.
    Gutenberg… guilty… not that important sacrifice my time with it yet. But one day… one day… lol Thanks for another great post, Hugh!

    1. Well done on not interacting with the trolls, Erika. They really dislike being ignored, and will often move on if nobody is willing to get into a fight with them.

      I like to keep my WordPress Reader uncluttered and only see the blog posts on it of those bloggers I know I will enjoy content from. It’s the bloggers I follow who publish more than one post a day that I look out for on there. It’s usually easy to find them.

      Don’t get left behind when the Classic editor is discontinued. It’s still two years away, but I’m hearing that WordPress is planning on withdrawing support for it as the number of users using it decline. Given that new bloggers can now only use Gutenberg when creating a new blog, I’m sure that time will come soon enough.

      1. Yes, simply ignore them and ban them from the blog. It only took me a few comments until I noticed that it makes no sense to “explain”.
        True, a cleared out WP Reader is saving time!
        You are absolutely right, ignoring the Gutenberg editor doesn’t make it go away… lol. I will have to check it out as soon as I can motivate myself that it is simply reasonable… haha.

  12. Thanks for the pitfall alert about limiting the number of tags to put on a blog post. I’d never read/heard that anywhere else. Lots of good information. Thanks!

  13. 🙂 Hugh, I created a “Commenting Policy” page on my blog; therefore, everyone is aware of what is expected of them when it comes to leaving comments in the comments section of my blog.

    Also, manually approving comments is a great way to play it safe.

    The Gutenberg Editor was one of those things that I used when it was in beta (So, I had lots of practice before WordPress made it its main editor).

    Do enjoy the rest of your day, my friend!

    1. A ‘Comments Policy’ sounds like an excellent idea, Renard, but I wonder how many people read it? I guess it’s the same for copyright notices, though. Even though I have one on my blog, people have still stolen my work, and I’ve had to take action against them.

      Thanks for testing out the Gutenberg editor. I expect it’s come a long way since then. I’m really enjoying using it. And, as I mentioned in the post, it’s not hard to use, just different.

  14. Hugh, you are a wealth of knowledge. Thank you for sharing so much and for going into great detail. I don’t have a blog, because right now there isn’t enough time to dedicate to it. but I enjoy reading all of your posts and save what you have written for when I do have a blog (and I take notes too.)

    I have even written (and continue to write, edit, and work on improving) future blog posts. I’ve started and am planning tutorials, and other meaningful, and fun things for my readers. I can tell from reading what other bloggers have written that it does take a lot of time. I think too it is about relationships with your readers, other bloggers and any of those that you help through a blog.

    There is so much to learn, and continue to learn about blogging.

    It’s interesting, and good that spammers can be blocked. I wouldn’t waste time with them, but instead stay focused on the goals for my (future) blog. Must keep priorities in order, right?

    I chuckled at The Birds. Every year at Halloween I try to watch it but haven’t this year.

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words and comments, Lea.

      If you decide to start a blog on WordPress, you’ll now only have the option to use the Gutenberg editor. It does take some getting used to, but I can highly recommend it. It’s really transformed the way I blog, all for the better. I think the results are amazing.

      There is a lot to learn about blogging. After almost six years of blogging, I’m still learning, but it’s all fun and part of the process.

      ‘The Birds’ is one of my favourite movies. I first watched it when I was a teenager. Even today, it still scares me when viewing it.

      Enjoy the rest of your week, and good luck with the upcoming blogging journey.

      1. Thanks Hugh, From the research I’ve done I’m pretty sure I’d go with WordPress.

        Can I ask you a question? I just read about tags, and do understand how they help people find posts when they are searching on google, and other search engines. Can you have tags and also categories, or does it have to be one or the other? I was thinking you could do both but after reading the support link you mentioned above I’m not so sure.

        I hope you don’t mind my asking you.

        The Birds is a classic. I know there was a sequel to it but I can’t find it for you. It starred the same actress that was in the first one (I don’t mean the one done in the 90’s). To me it was as good as the first one, which is a rarity.

        1. Yes, you can add both tags and categories to a blog post, Lea. After drafting your post, there is a section for adding tags, and another part for adding/selecting categories.

          I’m always happy to answer questions about blogging, so please feel free to ask any.

          Thanks for letting me know there is a sequel to The Birds. I’ll keep a lookout for it.

  15. Great advice as usual, Hugh 😀
    I haven’t tried Gutenberg yet, but one day I will try it.
    Short time ago I wrote a post and in the end I placed an NB for the readers, who could wish to share their posts at Twitter. I just asked for them to check if their bottom function or not and how to fix it.
    Not many read what I wrote, even they liked the post. This I see, as not many have changed their settings for sharing yet.

    1. Thanks, Irene.

      I’ve done the same. I’ve mentioned how to connect a Twitter account to a blog many times. On those posts, people thank me for the information, yet they still don’t comment their blog to their Twitter account. I guess there is only so much we can do. Now, if a blog is not connected to a Twitter account, I won’t share the post on twitter.

  16. Aha! Now I know why I was on that old post. I clicked over. It’s old age setting in, Hugh. Yeesh. Ha ha. So… that comment belonged here. I’ll sign off now before I confuse myself even more. Thanks for the awesome tips. 🙂

  17. I’m dreading switching to Gutenberg! I’ve always been absolutely useless with tech, and every new learning curve has been a painful experience. I just get so frustrated when what I see on my screen doesn’t correlate with any instructions I’ve been given – you know, when you’re being told to click on something that just isn’t there. Or it is there, and you click on it, and it doesn’t work. These things seem to happen a lot. I’ve been putting off trying Gutenberg because I don’t want that feeling of frustration.

    1. Reading the guides and watching the tutorials certainly helped me with Gutenberg, Annabelle. I gave myself plenty of time trying it out. I also set up a test post (which I still use) in my draft folder where I could play with the different functions Gutenberg offers. As Colleen said, using it is not hard, just different. I’m including a link to a guide that helped me a lot when I was first trying out Gutenberg. I hope it helps you as much as it did me.

      https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/

      Don’t hesitate to come back with any questions you have when you start trying it out.

  18. As always, such a lot of helpful hints. Luckily, I’ve not come across those demons that are Trolls, but I guess there’s always a first time! Very strange that a troll started as a ‘nice guy’ to start with. A sneaky way in!
    I did wonder if we’d be forced to change to the Guttenburg editor, I suppose I’ll have to give it a go at some point. Not looking forward to it, to be honest and that’s not because I don’t like change, in fact I welcome change, but I agree with Sue, I am happy with the classic editor. When the time comes, your blog will be my ‘Go To’ for help, that’s for sure!

    1. I was happy with the Classic editor, too, Sam, but the Gutenberg editor brings blogging to a whole new level. I can’t believe how much it’s changed the way I blog and how much time it has saved me when drafting new posts. There’s a steep learning curve, so now’s a good time to start giving Gutenberg a try. The more time you give it, the more it will pay off. I’d recommend you set up a test post in your draft folder where you can spend some time playing with it. However, do check out the tutorials and guides too. I made the mistake of going straight in without reading any guides. It was a mistake which resulted in me wasting lots of time.

  19. Great advice as usual, Hugh! I often recommend your blog to any new or struggling blogger. Thanks for the prompt to revisit my “manage” section. I think I have it set up like I want, but it’s been ages since I’ve looked. I did notice an option of “comment author must fill out name and email.” A few of the blogs I follow require me to do this every time I leave a comment, which I find really annoying. I wonder if they have this particular option checked (maybe without realizing it). I feel lucky that I haven’t experienced any real trolls on my blog. One snarky comment, but that’s what the delete comment button is for 😄

    1. That’s so kind of you to recommend my blog, Thank you so much, Janis.

      There are a few blogs that I leave comments on where I have to keep filling in my name, email and blog address despite having already having left a comment on the same post. These tend to be self-hosted blogs, so I now only leave a comment on them if I really do have something interesting to say. We should do all we can to make it easy for readers to leave comments, but that can open the floodgates to spam and trolls. It’s why I choose to moderate all comments before they appear on my posts. It does take up more time, but it’s worth it in stopping anybody who has left a comment before, all of a sudden leaving a nasty comment.

  20. Misunderstanding these points are indeed enough to scare a new blogger away, Hugh. You outlined the important ones and provided how-tos to deal with the potential problems. I’m so glad you got some inspiration from the prompt and could share your expertise with us!

    1. I wish I could participate a lot more in prompts, Robbie. However, with my new blogging routine, I’m down to publishing one post a week. However, some of my posts will give me the opportunity to participate in certain writing challenges and prompts.

  21. Thank you for the many gems in this post, Hugh. I see how many bloggers moderate their comments. Now, I know why.
    Despite reading/researching/talking to other bloggers, I have been unclear on how to tag and categorize blogs. This is the first time I have read about the “Pitfall alert.”
    Re: The Gutenberg Editor: My takeaway is this is a positive change to make. Although, I need to set aside a dedicated period of time to make this change.
    I am bookmarking and rereading this post, Hugh. The visual “how to” photos are especially helpful. Thank you:) Erica

    1. Thank you for all the great feedback, Erica.

      Tagging and categorising your blog posts are so important. I hide my face in horror when I see an uncategorised blog post. It doesn’t help any new visitor to a blog if all the posts are uncategorised. Plus, tagging and categorising is so easy to do. Sometimes, it is remembering to tag and categorise, but once you begin to, it’ll come as second nature to add tags and a category to each new post. Most readers love tags and categories. I use them a lot when searching for posts to read.

      I was fortunate in that I started to use the Gutenberg editor for the first time during the lull I always encounter in blogging during the last two weeks of December. It was the ideal time for me to watch some tutorials and read some guides on how to use Gutenberg. There’s a long learning curve, but it’s well worth it. And as Colleen says in one of her blog posts, using Gutenberg is not hard, just different.

      1. Thank you, Hugh. I am going to re-evaluate how I tag my posts. I appreciate the heads up on Gutenberg. This way I can start watching tutorials and prepare myself with information. Thank you!

      1. I honestly cannot understand the mentality of these people. What pleasure do they get out of such behaviour? I’ve seen some examples on Facebook and think ‘Where are the Admins of this Group that they let this continue?’ then they get abused and threatened too. An admin of one of our local groups had his children threatened!!! How brave was that supposed adult male to threaten an 8 and a 6 year old? Cowards, the lot of them.

        1. I totally agree, Eileen. Many of these people use their computer screen, tablet or mobile phone as protection to speel out their hate and anger. After that first attack towards another blogger on one of my posts, I switched to moderating every comment. It takes up a lot of my time but is worth it. Trolls hate being ignored. The few that have visited my blog soon moved on when I didn’t take their bait.

  22. Thanks for the mention for the writephoto challenge, Hugh… and for so much great advice.
    I admit that, so far, I have not had time to try out the new editor. It doesn’t scare me so much as annoy me… I happen to like the classic editor and, as I pay for my blog, don’t see why I should be forced to embrace a change I neither want nor need.
    I’d feel just the same if I went out to buy heels and found they’d sold me trainers instead without even asking.
    On the other hand, I’ve never met a bit of software that didn’t follow a logical process, so I am not about to start worrying about the change. Just growling occasionally 😉

    1. I thought exactly the same way as you do, Sue. However, there may be a glimmer of hope for those of you who are still using the classic editor. There is a ‘Classic’ block within the Gutenberg editor that gives users full use of the Classic editor. Unfortunately, what I wasn’t able to find out from WordPress was whether they will discontinue the block when they discontinue the classic editor in 2021. It’s there at the moment because, as with the Classic editor, there are bugs in the Gutenberg editor (mainly in the Gallery blocks), so users have the availability of using the classic editor when having problems with individual blocks. Who knows, they may just keep the Classic block.
      New users to WordPress now only have the option of using the Gutenberg editor. I expect that as the number of users using the classic editor declines to a certain level, WordPress will pull support for it. At the moment that’s due to happen at the end of next year but may come sooner.
      If you do decide to give Gutenberg a try, then you know where I am if you need any help. I’d be happy to talk you through it over the phone if that helped, too. 😀

  23. Great post. I have not been much of a victim to any of these but yes I am a victim if some of it like the following too many blogs. It’s too hard but on the contrary, I turn off the notification enabled and read their blogs if they are worth it. I am choosy and all my fellow bloggers have found that out. This is really helpful to everyone Hugh. I will reblog it to help others too. Thank you for a great post. I loved it and your blog. They are amazing. Will be reading more of your posts. 🙂✌

    1. Thank you so much, Suzan. I’m glad this post has helped you, even though you seem to be coping well with your encounters with the things I’ve listed in the post.

      Another reason why I rather unfollow blogs than just never visit them is that I dislike my WordPress Reader being cluttered up with blogs I don’t really have any interest in visiting anymore. I guess that goes down to me not particularly liking clutter of any kind anyway. I seldom use the WordPress reader but, when I do, I do like it showing blog posts I know I’m going to visit. But that’s just me. 😀

      Have a great week, and thank you for leaving the first comment on this post.

      1. You’re welcome. I am a new blogger, it’s just been 7 months since I started blogging so I am safe but I won’t be much safe in future. I have started a campaign against body shaming and one day or the other trolls will find me.

        You are right about the clutter but I like seeing new posts, weird stuff in them gives me crazy ideas. You are a choosy person too. I like it. It’s great to know someone like you.
        Thank you, Hugh. Hope you have a great week too. Your post deserved instant comment. It’s great.😊✌

        1. Good luck on your blogging journey, Suzan. There are lots of other bloggers out there who also offer free help and advice on blogging. The most important piece of advice I can provide you with is to always ensure blogging is fun. If it ever becomes a chore, then step back and take a good hard look at what’s gone wrong. It’s happened to me a few times, but now I seem to have found my perfect blogging balance.

        2. Thank you, Hugh. I know but you wrote the post like you were a good teacher explaining other students things. I will make sure to follow your advice and I am really glad you have a perfect blogging balance now. I enjoy blogging too. It’s very easy with all the support I get. Thank you for such a great advice. 😊✌

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