Is Now The Time For WordPress To Remove The Number Of ‘Likes’ From View On All Blog Posts?

During my recent blogging break, I heard the news that Instagram is trialling (with some of its users’) the removal of the ability to see who has ‘liked’ a post and how many ‘likes’ the post has had. Only the author of the post will have access to the information.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Why are Instagram conducting the trial?

There are a number of reason why the trial is being conducted but the main reasons are because some Instagram users reported that seeing too many ‘likes’ on a post made them feel demoralised.

In turn, some users went on to delete their account or develop ‘social media envy’ at seeing how well other users were doing compared to themselves. One user admitted that, for them, ‘the number of ‘likes’ was more important than the content’; in other words, they saw Instagram as more of a popularity contest.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Do you remember how you felt when your blog got its first ‘like?’

The news took me back to my early days of blogging and how I got excited if anybody ‘liked’ one of my blog posts. For me, a ‘like’ indicated that somebody had taken the time to read what I had written. Yes, somebody out there in the big wide world had taken a few minutes of their time to read and like something I had written.

It also motivated me to write more blog posts in the hope that they would attract even more ‘likes.’ Of course, if somebody also left a comment, that was a bonus!

As I grew the list of the blogs I followed, it wasn’t long before I realised that there was not enough time in my day to read, like and comment on all the blogs I followed. Given that some of the bloggers I followed were publishing new blog posts more than once a day, I was soon overwhelmed and found myself drowning in a sea of voices, all wanting my attention.

#blogging #attention #bloggers #socialmedia

Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

Have you played the click-happy ‘like’ game?

Something I began doing was to ‘like’ a post without reading it. I thought that by doing this, it would indicate to the blogger (who had written the post) that I had read their post and they, in turn, would continue to read and ‘like’ my posts.

I soon found out that lots of other bloggers and readers were playing the game (I thought I was the only one playing) because they were all in the same boat as me. The ‘like’ button was being misused and not being used as it should be by some users.

Would you press the like button on a post that contained bad news or news of a death?

In February 2018, I published a blog post posing the question if it was time to remove the ‘like’ button from blogs? Click the link below to read it.

Is It Time To Remove The ‘Like’ Button From Your Blog?

The response I got was overwhelming. However, what shocked me was the contents of some of the comments. Some readers admitted that they left a ‘like’ even if they had not read the post. Why? Because it was ‘showing support’ for the blogger, who had written the post, even if they didn’t have time to read it.

Really? Liking a post without reading it is a way to support a blogger?

Sometimes, we have to admit defeat, and just get on with it!

At the time I published the post, I also removed the ‘like’ button from my blog. Some readers commented that they missed seeing the like button on my blog but didn’t say why.

Unfortunately, what I didn’t know was that on WordPress, the ‘like’ button is connected to the ‘reblog’ button. Removing it also removed the ‘reblog’ button from all of my posts.

Despite my protests to WordPress about the unusual connection between the two buttons, they were not going to change anything, so I reluctantly reinstalled the ‘like’ button to get the ‘reblog’ button back. After all, most of us bloggers want our posts to get shared, don’t we?

Just because somebody hasn’t ‘liked’ your post, doesn’t mean they’ve not read it.

#bloggingtips #blogging

Image Credit: Pixabay

Are you as ‘click-happy’ as I once was?

In the past, you may have seen my Gravatar at the bottom of lots of blog posts indicating that I had ‘liked’ the post despite whether I had read it or not.

Then again, you may also have seen my Gravatar at the bottom of a post indicating that I had ‘liked’ the post even if I hadn’t particularly been interested in the contents. Why was I ‘liking’ blog posts that I hadn’t particularly enjoyed reading?

#blogging #socialmedia
Image by Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

Part of the blogging plan (I put together during my recent blogging break) is to stop ‘liking’ so many blog posts. Now, you’ll only see my gravatar next to the ‘like’ button if the post has been an enjoyable and interesting read.

It’ll also get a ‘like’ if it has given me ‘food for thought’, connected with me, made me say ‘Wow’ after reading it, evoked emotion, stopped me in my tracks, or made me leave a comment that isn’t empty or more than a couple of words long. After all, isn’t that why the ‘like’ button is there?

Are you somebody who presses the ‘like’ button on the majority of the blog post you read, or on the majority of blog post published by certain bloggers?

Do you take any notice of the Gravatar icons next to the ‘like’ button?

I don’t anymore. That’s why I hope the trial at Instagram goes well and convinces them that the ‘like’ button is of little use other than to that of the person whose post it is.

In my opinion, the ‘like’ button is something that serves little purpose other than to the person who wrote the post. I’d go as far as to say that the ‘like’ button found at the end of blog posts should disappear for good.

I do know that not everyone misuses the ‘like’ button. There are many readers who do read the whole post before pressing the ‘like’ button. However, remember there are many other ways we can support a blogger than becoming ‘like’ clicking-happy.

For example, once in a while, leave a blogger a comment that isn’t meaningless or one that they and others may see as an empty comment.

Don’t become a ‘comment spammer’ by leaving empty comments in the hope that you’ll get comments back on your posts. There’s no point in commenting for a comment’s sake, is there?

Why do some bloggers press the ‘like’ button on their own blog posts?

If you’re someone who says that you don’t always have time to leave comments, rather than spend small amounts of time leaving empty comments on lots of posts, use the time you save not leaving them by leaving an occasional comment that adds value to the post. Most bloggers will value that far more than lots of comments that add no value.

More Questions.

When, and for what reasons, do you use the ‘like’ button on WordPress? Do/have you ever misused it, and would you miss it if WordPress removed it from all WordPress blogs?

Before you answer any of my questions or leave a comment, this is what WordPress say about the ‘like’ button.

Let’s say you’ve found a particularly awesome post on WordPress.com. You’d like to tip your hat to the author and give him or her credit. At the bottom of the post, you see the Like button. Press it, and the author will know that you have acknowledged an exceptional, phenomenal blog post.

WordPress.com

Please feel free to answer any of the questions I have asked throughout this post by leaving me a comment. I look forward to hearing what you have to say.

Copyright © 2019 hughsviewsandnews.com – All rights reserved.

#Glimpses #books #shortstories

Click here to buy a copy.

206 comments

  1. I can honestly say I have not played the ‘like’ game. I only press the like button if I have read the post and genuinely liked it. And I usually comment if I like the post. That is why I cannot keep up with the blogs I follow and have become more selective about which blogs I read. It’s also why readership for my blog has grown slowly over time. I would not feel bad if the like button went away entirely but I suspect there might be an uprising amongst other bloggers on WordPress!

    1. It seems there is a 50/50 split about the subject, Molly. However, I do like what Instagram is trialling with some of their users. I hope the trial works and that other social media and bloggers platforms adopted the same process.

  2. Hugh, I enjoyed every sentence of your very insightful post. I only make use of the like button to acknowledge admiration for an outstanding post. It is also intended as a sincere source of motivation for the Author.
    It is completely absurd making use of the button in any instance beyond my expression above. This is my humble personal opinion.
    Great thanks for sharing a delightful post.

  3. I seldom use the like button; I don’t pay much attention to the likes on my own blog.
    If I like someone’s writing, I will spend a little time to write something, anything to let them know I was there/read/appreciated your work.

  4. As the years go by we become more selective in relation to blogging. Of course, we don’t have time to read all the posts and comments are an important part of blogging. On IG like or don’t a photo, so it’s OK to push the like button, but in here, generally the posts are complexes, the authors take time to write and edit, so a comment is deserved. I don’t care for the likes, but the comments are always welcome. We need to be careful with the likes, I’m always sure that I’ve read and understood before clicking the like button!

    1. I agree, Elizabeth, we do need to be careful about pressing the ‘like’ button on blog posts we have not thoroughly read. How do we know what we are ‘liking’ if we haven’t read it first? Would we review a book without reading it first, or review a product we’d never used?

  5. “Likes” are kinda when someone drives down your street and waves, then yells, “We have to do lunch.”
    Comments are the actual lunch date.
    I note the likes, just to see who has been through the neighborhood. Honestly I figure many are busy and don’t really stop and read, but wanted to say “Hi”
    I do think WP has changed a great deal over the years – seems like getting more and more like FB. Sad.

    1. You’re correct in what you say in that some users compare blogging the same way as they do with being on Facebook. There are hundreds of small clusters of bloggers who comment and like each other’s blog posts regardless of what the post is about. Now, there’s nothing wrong with that, but I decided it wasn’t for me. If I wanted to do that, I’d reopen my Facebook or Instagram account. For me, blogging is about writing, publishing and reading good quality content. Of course, interacting with other bloggers is also a key element but, for me, not in the same way as it is done on other social media platforms.

      1. “For me, blogging is about writing, publishing and reading good quality content.”
        This is true for many. Wish WP valued them more – as they used to. Always saddens me when bloggers of that nature get frustrated, just throw in the towel and head out.

        1. Not to mention the commercial business blogs seem to be more important than previously
          At one time WP scolded authors who seemed to be writing too much in promotion of their books and the thought of a PayPal button or any money raising would have people screaming. All there plans/perks for businesses? I guess WP is looking to become more Fakebook in several ways.
          Oh, well neighborhoods change. Still porches around to sit and chat on.

        2. I don’t mind authors advertising their books on their blogs. I see it as a free way to promote your work. As an author, I do it. However, I won’t follow any blogs where the author writes about nothing but their books and keeps asking readers to buy them. It’s a little like those annoying popups that pop up on a blog whenever you visit that ask you to subscribe to their newsletter! There’s often no way of saying ‘no thank you’, so the popup keeps popping up every time you visit. They’re very annoying.

  6. I read and clicked like. It is the same as I link my posts to my Twitter account and see the like on Twitter but see the stats that don’t match the likes from there. I used to be encouraged to keep doing what I am doing by the likes. I also read comments on blogs. You don’t have a like button on comments. I use that to agree with what someone else has written so I don’t have to do a lot of writing on blogs. Blogging is my social media as I have what I call by blog family. A number of people who communicate worldwide in post comments. I am also not a big writer on my blog, I an a photographer and let my photos do the talking. I have not heard of auto likes either.
    If I look at a blog that I don’t enjoy I don’t click like. Not a click happy chappy. The linking of like and reblog is not good but I don’t have any reblogs so I wouldn’t know about that. Good on you for keeping on at WP to improve the platform which can only befit us all.
    Brian

    1. Thanks for your comments, Brian.

      I had to remove the ‘like’ button next to comments on my blog because when somebody with a long blog name left a comment, their name would often overlap with the ‘reply’ button next to the comment. Unfortunately, it’s an error with the WordPress theme I use. The Happiness Engineers at WordPress told me that the only way to fix it was to remove the option of having a ‘like’ button next to comments. At the time, I was publishing lots of guest posts, and some of my guests told me of the problem they were having when trying to reply to comments. Therefore, the advise WordPress gave me seemed the best solution.

  7. I leave’ likes’ if I don’t have time to read a post but don’t want a week to go by without acknowledging it; the like means I intend to come back and read it. I try to comment on every post I read but there are time when I don’t know what to say and don’t know how to say I don’t know what to say, so I leave a ‘like’ to applaud the effort or to leave a sign of encouragement. The only time I was offended by the folks who randomly like things from the reader was when I posted a question. Anyone who read the title would know a comment of some sort was in order. The post got 12 likes before anyone left an answer. Why would people like a post when they can’t be bothered to read the title? Fortunately, most people on WordPress are thoughtful and decent. I would be surprised if there isn’t a way to automate ‘likes’.

    1. When you ‘like’ a post that you haven’t read, how do you remember which posts to go back and read, Rob? I mentioned in an earlier comment that I heard a story about a blogger who ‘liked’ a post which included an attack on another blogger. It was only when the blogger (who had been attacked in the post) asked why they had ‘liked’ the post that had personally attacked them, that the blogger who had pressed ‘like’ realised the mistake they had made. I did think that it was a sporadic incident to happen but decided I’d be better off never pressing the ‘like’ button unless I had read it.

      I totally get why people do press the ‘like’ button when they have read a post and have nothing to add, but I still don’t understand why somebody would press ‘like’ on a blog post they’ve not read and never come back to read. Some of the commentators on this post have come up with other excellent methods to support bloggers rather than by clicking ‘like’ on all their posts.

      I often get ‘likes’ left on posts within seconds of the post being published. I also get bloggers who will press the ‘like’ button on many of my posts within seconds of each other. To me, it tells me that they’ve misused the purpose of the button and haven’t read any of the posts at all.

      1. I keep a list of bloggers on a word document and I limit the number of bloggers I like as a bookmark. I primarily do it with b loggers I follow who write fiction or long pieces that take time and require thought. Teagan is an example. I don’t knowingly follow people who trash me so that extent clicking ‘like’ is an act of trust. Do I always remember to go back and read a post? No, but I usually do. The speed of reading depends on my level of concentration and the kind of writing. ‘How to’ pieces and haiku are easier to read than fiction. Thank you, Hugh. This is a good discussion.

        1. Hugh, I see discussions of how we use the ‘like’ button in terms of community. Do we want a community in which people trade likes for the illusion of credibility; or do we want a community of people who interact with each other and genuinely support each other. I think it’s possible to use the like button without making it part of a popularity contest.

        2. I agree, Rob. However, I do hope we can help those who feel demoralised by the number of ‘likes’ they see against a post here on WordPress, on other blogging platforms and social media sites. I hope the trial Instagram is conducting does work, and they adopted new rules around the ‘like’ button as to who can see the numbers and who can’t. I’m positive it will go a long way in helping.

        3. I understand your concerns Hugh. One of the reasons I gave up on Flickr is that people were more concerned with ‘likes’ than the quality of the work they were ‘liking’. On Flickr we called ‘likes’ ‘faves’ and as long as you were in the right clique and on the right ‘fave’ exchange everything you posted would get two or three hundred ‘faves’. — That’s why I pay no attention to those numbers. I focus on the quality of my comments and the quality of the art work produced by the people I follow. I rarely know how many ‘likes’ a post gets but I do note the comments.

  8. So much of the information you share I find very valuable, Hugh.

    I totally agree about the need to discontinue the ‘like” button except perhaps for the author to see. Personally, I find the “like” button to be shallow. I also agree that the reblog and like buttons should be separate. To me, if someone reblogs a post it means they truly find value in it, vs a quick click of a like on a post that may not have been read.

    It is most unfortunate that WP is not very receptive to bloggers’ suggestions as when you said you’d asked them to discontinue the like button. BTW, I am not a like button maniac and use it rather judiciously. Certainly, only if I have read the post. I do leave comments on posts that are helpful or move me — even with sad subject matter.

    1. I really hope the trial at Instagram works and that other social media and blogging platforms adopted the method that only the author of a post can see how many likes a post has had (and which users ‘liked’ the post). It makes a lot of sense to me, especially if it helps with the issues some users are having.

      I have no idea wey WordPress, in their wisdom, connected the ‘like’ button to the ‘reblog’ button. It makes no sense to me at all. I would definitely remove the ‘like’ button from all of my posts if I were able to keep the ‘reblog;’ button. I think many other users would probably do the same.

      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts with us on the subject of the ‘like’ button on blogs.

  9. I read through this post and appreciated your questions. I deleted the Facebook author page but kept the regular Facebook for family connection. Facebook is interested in paid advertisement. It owns Instagram.

  10. I only “like” posts that resonate with me or provide value to me. (Which is why I liked this post!) I would certainly be fine with only the author seeing the number of likes. I feel like comments are a better gauge of the level of interest in my content. If a blog post inspires me enough to leave a comment, then the author did their job.

    1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us, Gina. I agree with you. Comments are far more valuable to me than a ‘like.’ For me, the occasional meaningful comment is worth far more than pressing the ‘like’ button on all my blog posts.

  11. Super post, Hugh. I use the like button after I read a post. If I think a post would interest mt readers I hit the Twitter button. I try to leave a comment on each post I read. There are some bloggers who do multiple posts a day so comments don’t make sense unless it is an unusual occurrence. I don’t like or comment on reblogs unless it is exceptional and I haven’t read the reblog at the source.

    1. I agree about those bloggers who publish multiple posts a day, John. I’ve now unsubscribed from email notifications when a new post is published from blogs which publish more than once a day. Instead, I will catch up with posts on the WordPress Reader (providing I’m there when they publish a post). As I follow over 175 blogs, posts soon disappear off the WP Reader.

      I rarely click to read a post that has been reblogged unless the title of the post attracts my attention and the person who has reblogged the posts gives a good introduction as to why they are reblogging it. I get frustrated by seeing the same post pop up on the WP Reader or in my email box on the same day. It’s one of the reasons why I don’t share a guest post I’ve written, or a review of one of my books, for at least a week after the original has been published.

  12. I’ve been thinking alone the same lines, Hugh. It is possible to “like” a post from the Reader which I suspect a lot of people do. They should make it mandatory to at least “visit” a site to click “like.” I will only click “like” if the post is a Wordless Wednesday or Silent Sunday.

    1. Yes, it is possible to ‘like’ a post from the reader without so much as opening the post itself, Jan. It’s just another way of how the ‘Like’ button is being misused by some users. I agree totally that the ‘like’ button should remain ‘ghosted’ out for at least a couple of minutes before a user is able to hit it. I’m sure it would stop a lot of people from misusing it.

  13. There are some very interesting points you make here, Hugh. Yes, in the beginning, I too counted every like and the more the better. But thank God, I am healed. I noticed how this behavior made me go with some topics which seemed to attract more readers but which I lost the path of my actual blog purpose. Also, those “award games” went into a similar direction. Yes, I am healed. I don’t care how many likes I get. I care much more that what I write meets my blog purpose and is coming from that place inside of me which made this blog possible.
    I like that question why some bloggers like their own posts… I am asking that myself too. I think if you don’t like it, you would not post it… lol!

    1. ‘Stats’ have their benefits, but some bloggers and users get so obsessed with them, Erika. I’ve seen many new bloggers who will concentrate more on their stats rather than writing and publishing compelling, good quality content. Most end up abanding their blog. It’s the same for those who leave a link to their blog and a comment that says something along the lines of ‘Hi, please visit my blog and tell me what you think’ without any mention of the post they’ve left the comment on. It may sound harsh, but I send those types of comments straight to my spam folder.

      For me, a meaningful comment left every once in a while is far more valuable than clicking the ‘like’ button on all the posts I publish.

      And I like your thoughts behind why some bloggers press the ‘like’ button on their own posts. An earlier comment mentioned that the number of likes boosts a posts SEO ranking on search engines like Google. I’ve never heard of that and have asked them to explain it more. I hope we get a response.

      1. Hugh, I am totally with you in this. I act the same way. When I get the feeling that someone only comments in order to draw me to their blogs I often send them to spam (depending on the comment) but always delete them. This is not Twitter or Instagram. This is a blog platform.

        I just have to admit that very often people read but don’t want to be involved in a discussion. Some don’t even run a blog by themselves, they only want to read… the dark number. But I am sure that there are many under those who frequently visit without us noticing by likes or comments. I am fine with that too. Really, I am not running that blog for myself but because I it is a way to reach out and hopefully leave something that may inspire or help the one another.

        I am curious about that answer too, Hugh. I never heard of that either. But I think that mostly those who are focused on the number of likes like their own posts because they think those who see their posts are the same impressed by numbers. Just thinking.

        However, thanks for your post. It is really thought-provoking also in reflection to myself.

        1. I agree with you about the readers who do not leave any comments, Erika. I’m okay with them, too. Nobody should feel under any obligation or pressure to read or leave a comment on a blog post. It shouldn’t be of concern to anyone (including the author of the blog post). I still read lots of blog posts and comments where people apologise for not blogging or visiting blogs. Nobody should ever feel the need to apologise. I wouldn’t expect anyone to apologise for not visiting or leaving any comments on my blog. I’m sure many bloggers feel precisely the same as I do about that.

        2. Gosh, you are right. I am also one of those who apologized for not reading other people’s posts when time got rare. It was not so much a feeling of obligation but more of appreciation for their work. Since my time is limited on a regular basis I stopped that… lol. I fully agree with what you said, Hugh. As you said, I too would never expect others to visit. It is always interesting talking to you, Hugh!

        3. Thanks, Erika. I’m glad you think so. It always pleases me when a subject I write about gets readers into a conversation on any of my blog posts. For me, it’s what blogging is all about.

  14. I’m a reader of posts and do set aside days that I do that exclusively. On those days, I find myself becoming weary in writing comments and soon those comments become a short word or two. It can be exhausting. I do like the “Like” button. It does allow me to let the blogger know I was there and appreciated their work without having to write further comments than I can must enthusiasm for or due justice. However, I have not ever, not once, even considered looking to see how many likes a post has had on any media medium. I had no idea it was even a thing! AND, I’m concerned about the emotional health of those who are 1st comparing themselves as well as feel threatened or demoralized over someone elses success! If, the likes are that important to them, perhaps they’d be more successful if they took the time to discover what it is others are doing that is so sucessful and learn how to better their own posts from it?

    1. Leaving comments can be very time consuming, Laura. It’s why I now never feel obliged to leave a comment or to comment just for the sake of leaving a comment. It doesn’t benefit anyone.

      It’s very concerning that blogging envy, and social media envy have become known conditions in today’s world. We should never try and compare ourselves to other bloggers or others who use social media. One of the best pieces of advice I was given when I first started blogging was ‘be yourself, and never compare yourself to somebody else.’ However, I’m delighted that Instagram is trailing the removal of some of its users to be able to see how many likes a post has had. It’s a significant step forward in overcoming and helping those users who do become victims to the success of other people.

  15. I also wanted to chime in about liking photo-blogs. Sometime there isn’t much to comment on other than “oooh, nice shot,” which I do, but a simple like works for me either way. I also wanted to ask if anyone is experiencing a ton of likes to their comments on other blogs? This is starting to feel spammy…the same few bloggers are liking my comments on other posts which means a lot of emails I must delete, and notifications on the blog to deal with. Often, if a new person likes my post, I will click the email to visit them to see what they are about. Sorry for all the comments, but judging by the 8000 comments, I’m in great company 😁

    1. Somebody else mentioned photography blogs in an earlier comment. I agree that you can’t always say a lot about photos (other than maybe ‘nice shot’), so the ‘like’ button serves it’s purpose if you think the photo(s) is/are fantastic.

      Yes, I’ve experienced those bloggers who seem to press ‘like’ on all the comments I leave on other blogs. To me, it is spammy, and it’s like they’re shouting ‘HERE I AM, COME VISIT.’ I’m far more likely to visit their blog if they read one of my posts and leave a meaningful comment. I just ignore them, although the email notifications are a problem. I wonder if there is a way of turning off those kinds of email notifications?

      1. I am totally OK with someone liking the photos I post but who doesn’t love an occasional “attagirl”? I don’t think you can turn off the like notifications for those. My delete button has been on overdrive lately :/

  16. Nothing like coming back to the blogosphere with a controversial subject, Hugh! I like the “like” button on the blog and on social media, and I echo comments made by Saddle and Terri. Sometimes I don’t have time to leave a meaningful comment and just hit like for the acknowledgment. I know people do that to my posts, too, especially right after I post on Sunday mornings. With my email subscriptions, with blogs I already know, I tap like which takes me straight to their post, which I read and mostly comment. There are a lot of wordpress dot org/self hosted sites that don’t have like buttons so then I have to leave a comment. Not usually an issue, but like today, I’m tapping all this into my tablet and it is time consuming.
    My relationship with some bloggers is purely with the like button. Others are friends and deserve a comment. I admit to liking before I read sometimes but my blogging friends know my sincerity. Great post full of interesting perspectives…and I really mean that!

    1. LOl, I thought this subject would get lots of people talking, Terri. I think there should be lots more posts which touch on controversial topics in the world of blogging.

      I definitely get why some people hit ‘like’ after reading a post, but I still don’t understand why anyone would ‘like’ a post they’ve not read. I once heard of a blogger who hit ‘like’ on a post of a blogger they had followed for years, only to be contacted by another blogger (who’d they followed) and who had been attacked personally in the post they had not read but liked. That taught me to be so careful when it came to clicking ‘like’ on posts, I’d not really read properly. The thought of me ‘liking’ a post which attacked another blogger really terrified me. I know the odds of it happen are very rare, but I could have so easily been one of those rare occasions.

      I no longer feel obliged to leave a comment on a post I have read unless I really do have something valuable to say and which isn’t going to be seen as an ’empty’ comment. Commenting for the sake of leaving a comment is, in my eyes, a waste of our time and doesn’t benefit anybody. Our time is so precious, and we should use every moment wisely. I much rather get comments that add value to the post I’ve written or which clearly prove that the person leaving the comment has read the whole post. And they don’t need to feel obliged to comment on every post. A meaningful comment every once in a while is worth lots more than a ‘like’ on every single blog post. I believe most bloggers feel the same.

      Thanks for the fantastic feedback on this post. I’m delighted it got you and many others to share their thoughts.

  17. Interesting topic, Hugh 🙂
    I use the Like, if I really like the post after reading it. Sometimes I have something to ad with a comment or I just wish to encourage the blogger to continue the style, as I can see a great future in that style.
    I have also had visit by other bloggers, who think they are correct by liking maybe 5 or 10 of my posts and so fast, that it hasn’t been possible to read all of them, before they just hit the Like. Those I don’t need.
    I think, it is up to each one of us to use the Like in a correct way.

    1. Agreed, Irene. Like anything else, people will use things how they want and not necessarily how they are supposed to be used when they were created.

      However, as other commenters have mentioned, there are many different ways we can support bloggers other than by just liking all of their posts (even without reading them). I still can’t get my head around why somebody would press the ‘like’ button on one of my posts without having read it first. Which brings me to the matter which you mentioned of those who like a large number of posts within seconds of each other. Just like those who press the ‘like’ button on a post within seconds of it being published, they really do make it so unfair to those that use the ‘like’ button as it’s supposed to be used.

  18. I remember reading your last post on the misuse of the like button, and I still agree with you. I do not want to click “like” if I haven’t read the post and I won’t, but as for Instagram and Facebook, the people behind these sites have admitted that in the beginning, their agenda was to conduct a social experiment to see how they could change human behaviour. Ehrm looks like it worked in some cases, people really have social envy and their mental health has suffered as a result of Facebook. The figures are way too high.

    1. I really hope that the trial Instagram is conducting does persuade them to remove the ability of users (other than the author) to see how many ‘likes’ a post has got. And I do hope that other social media and blogging platforms all take note and make the change.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this subject.

  19. I only like posts that I have read and liked. I am happy to see people liking my posts although I am sure a few of them have not read it. It would be great to comment on all posts but there just isn’t time. The like button, for me, shows that I did read the post and felt it worthy of a like. Nothing is perfect of course, especially in the social media world.

    1. I’m sure that many bloggers have ‘likes’ on posts given by readers who have not read the post, Darlene. I still don’t see how ‘liking’ a post you’ve not read is supporting a blogger, but I’m hoping somebody will be able to prove me wrong. A previous comment mentioned that the number of ‘likes’ boosts the SEO ranking of a post. I’ve never heard of that, so am hoping somebody will be able to explain how it works.

  20. I like posts that I have read but that I may not have a comment about… I think if something is well written and has engaged you to the end then it deserves a like at the least! I’m not a fan of just commenting with “great post” as I feel that no one really benefits from it…a like to me means that the reader has indeed liked out post and read it which means more to me xx

    1. Comments such as ‘great post’ are what I call ’empty comments,’ Suzi. I completely agree with you that comments like that add no value at all.

      I’ve found out that not everyone that clicks the ‘like’ button has actually read the post, so I’m not convinced that the ‘like’ button is always being used for the right purposes. I hope the trial Instagram is doing works. I think if WordPress implements it, it will stop some of the misuses of the ‘like’e button.

      1. I have that too and it’s so frustrating! I’ve sat and watched my phone light up before now with 20 likes on different posts in a matter of seconds, it’s quite annoying! Xxx

  21. I wouldn’t mind if we could like a post and only the author could see it.

    I try to only like a post I’ve read, though there may be the occasional support like. I started to get overwhelmed bt posts as I followed new blogs, but now I don’t attempt to read everything. I know I don’t appreciate gratuitous likes and it feels hollow when a person likes multiple long posts in about a minute – I know they haven’t read them.

    1. Too right they haven’t read them, Sean. I think they do that more out of some hope of getting some new followers or clicks over to their blog.

      I like the idea of only the author having the ability to see how many likes a post has got. I think it would stop a lot of misuse of the ‘like’ button. I hope it works on Instagram, and other social media and blogging platforms do the same.

        1. Any change always seems to create an outcry on WordPress, Sean. Sometimes, users believe something is being replaced when it’s only being improved. And I’m always amazed by how many complain about something without even having given it a reasonable amount of time to try out or haven’t read or watched any tutorials.

  22. I only press like if I have read a post and liked it. If I start reading a post and realize it doesn’t interest me then I just stop, exit and do not hit like. And I only comment if I have something to say. I still may enjoy reading it, even though I have nothing to add. The whole issue of likes is problematic, so maybe it would be a good thing for WP to reexamine it. I once posted a new blog, and it was liked by a new follower, who then went on to like my past 40 blogs. As it was only about 15 minutes or less between my posting it and when the stats showed up, I knew she could not possibly have read all 40 posts. What did she do, just go down the list and hit like on every one, hoping for a follow back? I find that kind of thing annoying. Lately I’ve been getting new followers whose blogs when I check them out, seem to consist of 3 or 4 repetitive posts, obviously spammers, and last week I was made aware by a fellow blogger that my whole site had been “harvested” by some website in India. Which made sense as there had seemed to be a big discrepancy between the number of views and visitors I had when I posted a new blog (50 or so) and the number of WP likes I received (14 or so). I had contacted a Happiness Engineer about this a few months ago, and he told me I must be popular on google search, (how could that be when my blog is so generic, I have less than 200 followers and none of them e-mail followers?). So the other day when it happened again after a new post, I contacted a HE again, and he was very evasive. I’m sure WP must know about this harvesting problem. The site was called tygpress.com and is in India but the domain is godaddy and there was apparently a form you could fill out if you objected to it. The blogger who pointed it out to me, was so annoyed she closed out her WP account, but then she was publishing creative fiction and it was a source of revenue for her, as well as a copyright infringement. I guess you could consider “harvesting” to be reblogging without permission or notification, but the posts did link back to my blog, when I clicked on more. I’m not sure if it is worth trying to do anything about it or contact WP as she said they knew and weren’t doing anything about it, but maybe they can’t? But it does give me the satisfaction of explaining to me why my number of visitors/views were so much higher than the number of my WP LIKES. PS. Sorry this is so long, I was referred here by Linda a fellow blogger, as she thought you might have some knowledge of this ‘harvesting’ problem.

    1. Oh, I’m totally aware of the ‘Tygpress’ problem, Joni. I’ve heard that the site has temporarily been taken down and that it displays an apology to those bloggers (including me) who have filed a DMCA for copyright infringement. I won’t go into it much here, but you can read lots more details by clicking the following link to the post of a blogger I follow (who wrote a post about ‘Tygpress).

      https://renardsworld.wordpress.com/2019/08/04/tygpress-scraped-the-living-daylights-out-of-wordpress/

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts about the ‘like’ button. I, too, have had bloggers who have ‘liked’ a large number of my blog posts within a few seconds of each other. I can only presume that they see it as a way of getting some free publicity by having their Gravatar displayed next to the ‘like’ button (although WordPress limits the number of Gravatars it now shows). I’m also sure that the blogger concerned will hope you will follow them back. I just ignore those kinds of bloggers.

  23. These are some interesting thoughts Hugh….I like the “like” button for the simple reason that if I don’t have anything to contribute to the conversation, I won’t leave a comment, even if I enjoyed the post. The “like” gives me a way to tell the writer that I read and enjoyed their post without having to try to come up with something impactful to say. I don’t press “like” unless I did read the entire post and connect with it in some way.

    1. Phew, I’m glad to read your last sentence, Terri. To me, those two reasons are why the ‘like’ button should be clicked.

      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts with us on the subject of the ‘like’ button.

  24. As you said, I found the ‘Like’ metric encouraging AND demoralizing when I first started. ‘Twas Facebook ‘Likes’ that have caused the most social anxiety in my online life.

    1. I left Facebook two year ago, but I remember the ‘like’ frenzy I used to go through on it. Unfortunately, I think it spilled over onto WordPress. In fact, anywhere where there is a ‘like’ button.

  25. The only time I press “like” is to show the author I’ve read and enjoyed the post, and I only comment if I have something to say.
    Because I use it this way I will press ”like” even for sad content. Often in this case though I will leave more in a comment.
    I don’t look at the Gravatar Icons.

  26. Instead of using the like link to show that I’ve enjoyed, I’ll share the post if necessary, or I’ll leave a comment. Like you, I don’t have time to read every post that comes to my email. I liked this post, because I read it all the way to the end and enjoyed it.

    1. Reblogging or sharing the post via social media (without pressing the ‘like’ button) is certainly another two ways to support fellow bloggers, Ann. I would much rather leave a comment than a ‘like’, although 99% of the time, if I do leave a comment, then I will also press the ‘like’ button. Now, I will only press the ‘like’ button if I really have enjoyed my reading experience and read the whole post.

      I had to fish your comment out of my WordPress spam folder. I’ve no idea why it ended up in there.

      1. I don’t know why it ended up in there either. That was kind of weird. Although with WordPress now, since I am totally blind and use a screen reader, re-blogging is a bit difficult now. That’s why I like the press this button.

        1. Well are used to re-blog if I couldn’t press this. There’s one blogger that I follow she doesn’t have the press this link added to her sharing links, so if I like what she does I either read blog or do a ping back. And now, I’ll have to do a ping back because I can’t use the reblog button like I used to.

        2. ‘Pingbacks’ are another great way to support fellow bloggers, Ann. They also help the SEO rating of your post on Google, etc. A win/win for both you and the blogger whose post you are linking to.

  27. I’ve been blogging for eight years and LOVE the like button. I click it when I don’t have time to leave a comment. It’s another way my community lets me know they are in contact with my blog.

    1. So, you take note of who has ‘liked’ all your posts, Susie? Do you also take a look at who has clicked the ‘like’ button on the posts of other bloggers?

      I stopped taking notice of who pressed the ‘like’ button next to any of my blog posts as soon as I realised that some users were misusing the button, and when some also admitted that they didn’t always read a blog post that they had ‘liked’. If WordPress removed the ability of your readers to see how many likes anyone of your posts has (and who has liked them), do you think the number of likes would reduce? I hope you don’t mind me asking these questions. I’m interested in knowing.

      1. WP won’t get rid of likes because we have the choice. We can deactivate the Like button.

        I do look at likes of other blogs. It’s great when it’s a new one and I see a friend also follows. I pay attention to who likes my posts too.
        Instagram is completely different. Those are photos or video that take seconds to view. A blog takes more time. Time is like gold these days. I don’t care if a small percentage of bloggers don’t read my posts but like it anyway. I always get a lot more views than likes. I have an Australian friend who told me it always made her day when she saw my smiling avatar. I feel the same way! It’s up to me to hook them into reading. More than half only skim blogs anyway. I don’t have a lot of time either. I’m typing this on my phone! 😂 So I find it aggravating when I want to read a post and let the blogger know I was there with a Like but didn’t have time to comment. Hope that answers your questions. I gotta get back to work! 🖥⏰

        1. Yes, but as I mentioned in my post, if you deactivate the like button, the reblog button on our posts also disappears. I know that it wouldn’t matter to some bloggers, but most of us bloggers want the reblog button there, don’t we? If you know of another way to deactivate the like button (without the reblog button also disappearing), then please let us know, Susie. When I last spoke to the HP Engineers at WordPress, there was no way around it.

          Thanks for answering my other questions. From an earlier comment from another blogger, given that WordPress limit the number of Gravatars that appear next to the ‘like’ button, there’s no guarantee which Gravatars will be on view. For me, a comment means a lot more than a ‘like’. In fact, I see ‘comments’ as my readers giving me awards (something I put on an image when I stopped accepting the blogging awards you often see making the rounds on WordPress).

  28. You have written an interesting perspective regarding the like button.

    My friend and I had a discussion regarding the “like” button, in which I admit that sometimes, I like a post not because I really *like* it but rather, it is a form of acknowledgement, while he only likes a post if he really likes it. But we both agree that comments should be left only if our comments worth something to the writer, as you have written.

    But personally, I have never post on my blog for likes, knowing subconsciously that some people would like without reading. I value substantial comments more, although I must also admit that there are times that I am influenced by the number of likes and feel that why my posts are not getting the attention they should be deserving…oh, the conundrum…

    1. Thank you, Tien. Thank you for also sharing your (and your friends) thoughts on the subject of the ‘like’ button.

      In a post I published earlier this year, I asked the question ‘What makes a blog post successful? and the majority of readers who left a comment said ‘good, quality, meaningful comments that add value to the post.’

      As for your conundrum, don’t go down that slippery slope. I’ve seen too many bloggers go down that slope and never reappear in the blogging world.

  29. I guess I am a bit of a rebel over the like button, removing it from my blog site. You are the first on I have found to share my feeling on that matter. It’s sad because it has become a numbers game and what is written is secondary.

    1. I’ve found that those who are more interested in the numbers, rather than writing and publishing good, quality content, usually don’t last more than about 12 months. What I didn’t mention in this post is that I also believe that a small minority of bloggers see the ‘like’ button as a way of getting some free publicity. They hope that by leaving a ‘like’ (without reading a post or ever visiting the blog again) some readers will click on their Gravatar and follow their blog.

  30. I live in the country where Instagram is doing their pilot project. It was upsetting in the beginning not to see the number of likes but only because that was what I was used to. Now it doesn’t bother me. I like the photos that I like, make comments if there is something I want to say, and still enjoy my feed.
    As for WordPress, I tend to do the same. And often I will like the post if I have enjoyed the read and do not have a comment.

    1. That’s so great to hear, Colline. I’m glad you’re still enjoying your Instagram experience without being able to see who (and how many people) have ‘like’ a post. Isn’t it often the case that many of us will not like something because it means ‘change?’ As somebody who disliked ‘change’ for many years, I now know that ‘change’ doesn’t always mean that things are going to get worse. Sometimes, it also means improvement.

      1. I agree Hugh. And this particular change doesn’t seem to matter. I can see how it can be beneficial to the mental health of others who focus on comparing their account to that of others.

  31. 🙂 Hugh, WordPress has come a long way in regards to the “Like” button.

    Back in 2012 (the time-period I had my first WordPress blog), they used to show the Gravatar images of everyone who liked your post.

    As time passed, they eventually changed it so only a certain number of them will show; the reason for this was because all of those countless Gravatar images were slowing down the loading time of people’s blogs.

    I genuinely believe that the “Like” button is appropriate for the shy ones who genuinely liked our blog post and are a bit too timid to leave a comment.

    It is a pity that a large number of people abuse the “Like” button by pressing it without reading our blog posts.

    For the record, I am against people abusing the “Like” button and it is something that I would not partake in.

    1. I’m glad WordPress changed the method of how many Gravtars showed next to a blog post, Renard. Given that people press the ‘like’ button for different reasons, they did the right thing by limiting how many Gravatars showed.

      I get what you say about people who don’t like leaving comments, and if they have read the post and enjoyed reading it, then why not press the ‘like’ button? But, as you say, it’s the readers who abuse the reasons why there is a ‘like’ button that will make some bloggers (like me) question as to why the ‘like’ button matters. If only the author of the post could see the number of ‘likes’ and the Gravatars of those who pressed ‘like’, I wonder how many people would stop pressing the ‘like’ button if they hadn’t read the post?

  32. A lot of my liking is to add SEO klout to blogs I generally approve of, even if I don’t get to read the full article. I don’t get much time to read all of the blog posts as I used to but want to participate in the blog-o-sphere and want to lend my support to those who do such a terrific job at blogging.
    Fortunately I never experienced social media envy, so that side has never bothered me.

    1. Does the number of ‘likes’ a post get, help it with its SEO ratings then, Christoph? I had no idea it did. Maybe that’s the reason why some bloggers ‘like’ their own posts?

      Many of us often find ourselves in the position of not having much time to read blog posts. It’s one of the reasons why I will now only read a blog post if it has certain criteria (I’ll be sharing what they are in a future post). My days of reading blog posts that do not really interest me have now long gone (which gives me more time to read, comment and support the posts I do enjoy reading).

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this subject.

  33. Yes I think we all do it…almost a way to say Hello to a friend blogger or letting know that you did visit, especially when I am not putting much into mine…:D and sometimes I do like not because I agree but just because I find it is worth reading or sometimes to mark the effort that the person has put writing or drawing it, in some case the just to underline courage to post something unusual a bit of track of mainstream saying.

    The first few years I used to check my stats a lot, not much anymore, don’t have time or it doesn’t matter anymore, can’t really tell, I think it is more lack of time but also a state of mine telling that’s what I do, you like it fine and welcome if you comment, if you don’t like it, doesn’t matter much to me.

    Of course there is also the topic of followers, most of the time I do follow people following me, but of course unless you don’t have anything else to do, nobody have time to truly follow a thousand or more blogs, it is like my recorded list on my tv account…getting bigger, until you flush recordings because it is too big, but I don’t flush much followed bloggers, except maybe those who pour so many posts a day that it fill my reading list, spending more time scrolling through blogs rather than reading…:)

    Well that was some of my thoughs on this, but have to stop now, eitther have to work (do work at home luckily) or watch some of those hundreds of recorded programs…:)

    1. I think that is how many people look at it. They believe that by clicking ‘like’, it will tell the author that you visited. But should it matter whether we visited or not? And given that I mentioned in this post that I used to click ‘like’ without reading a post, it made me wonder just how many readers were doing the same. Why click ‘like’ if we haven’t read the post? It leaves us open to the possibility that we could be liking something that we would never dream of liking.

      I completely agree with you that if somebody has been encouraged to post something unusual (and which makes me say ‘wow’ after reading it), then the post does deserve a ‘like.’ After all, that’s one of the reasons why WordPress made having a ‘like’ button available.

      I’ve written about blog stats in previous posts. I think they do matter to many bloggers when they first start blogging (sometimes at the expense of content). However, for many of us, the importance of blog stats soon disappear. Like clicking the ‘like’ button, they can become addictive, so we should never allow them to take over the importance of the content that we write and publish.

      A ‘follow for a follow’ is a slippery path, especially as some bloggers will unfollow you as soon as you follow them. Again, it’s all about popularity to them, rather than writing and publishing good, quality content.

      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts with us on these topics. I appreciate it.

        1. I see ‘liking’ a comment differently if the comment you’re liking does not warrant a response or if you’ve nothing else of value to add. I use it a lot, rather than leaving an empty comment. It, at least, acknowledges that you’ve seen the comment.

  34. As you can see, Hugh, I’ve ‘liked’ your post. As a reader, I like the like button. I will ‘like’ most posts I read all the way through. If I’ve read them all the way through, it means that I have enjoyed/liked them. If I don’t enjoy a post, I won’t read it all the way through and won’t ‘like’ it. I also like to see who else has liked new blogs I come across. If a few friends have liked posts, then it’s a fair indication that the blog is worthy and I might check it out a bit more. If none of my friends have liked it yet, I’ll be a bit more discerning. I actually take more notice of it as a reader, and more notice of the comments as a writer, so I’d prefer it to stay. I try to leave a meaningful comment, regardless of how brief when I feel I have something to add to the conversation. As I would in an in-person conversation, a ‘like’ is like a nod to indicate I’m listening to the conversation but I don’t always feel I need to contribute.

    1. Thanks for sharing with us how you use the ‘like’ button, Norah.

      Until I realised how little notice I was taking of who had ‘liked’ any of my posts (or of those who had liked the posts of other bloggers), I was much the same as you and used it as a method of acknowledging the post. I also switched off the email notifications I got from WordPress whenever anybody ‘liked’ one of my posts. I also realised that anybody looking at who had liked a particular post would only see the first 20 or so Gravatras (unless they clicked the number of likes just under the reblog and like buttons). Given that I also knew that some bloggers click ‘like’ on a post within seconds of it being published, I began to question just how many people were using the facility of the ‘like’ button like I was. Once I read what WordPress had to say as to why the ‘like’ button was at the bottom of blog posts, I realised I wasn’t always using it for the right reasons. I also had to question myself as to why it mattered if somebody had or had not liked one of my posts. Did it really matter? It doesn’t, does it? Now I knew it didn’t matter, then how many people felt the same way as me? Hence, this post.

      If WordPress did remove the ‘like’ button, have you thought about how you would then indicate to a blogger that you had read their post? I’d be interested to know.

      I hope many others also share with us their reasons as to why they click the ‘like’ button.

      Again, thank you for sharing your thoughts on this subject. I enjoyed reading them.

      1. I actually feel frustrated when posts don’t have a like button and I can’t quickly let the author know that I have read and enjoyed. I don’t like to just write ‘read’ in a comment box – such a waste of comment space. And, as I said, I don’t always have something meaningful to add to the conversation. I guess authors will never know I’ve read if they don’t have a like button and I don’t comment. I think WP should leave it up to authors whether they add the button to their posts or not. The choice is already there.

        1. I agree with leaving empty comments such as ‘read’ in the comments box, Norah. Why waste our time leaving comments like that when they don’t benefit anybody?

          For me, if somebody shares my post on social media, links back to it via a pingback, reblogs it, or asks me to write a guest post, then it tells me that they’ve read a/the post they are sharing.

          You’re right about the choice of having a ‘like’ button is there. Unfortunately, because the ‘like’ button is connected to the ‘reblog’ button, removing the ‘like’ button also removes the ‘reblog’ button.

          However, I’d be happy with only the author of the post being able to see who has ‘liked’ any of their posts.

        2. I try to remember to share posts I like on Twitter (I don’t share any I haven’t read or don’t like) but I don’t always have time to add a comment to them. I don’t have any firm or positive views about social media. My jury is out. 🙂

  35. I hope it doesn’t go away. I always open the post. I may skim the text but if I like it then I click that button. Most of the blogs I follow are about photography, so liking a picture and or commenting is important.

    1. I agree about photography blogs. If I like just one photo, then I will probably leave a ‘like.’ However, the photo does have to be something special and grab my attention. However, I’m also more likely to leave a comment about why I like a particular photo.

  36. Actually, I have been thinking about this for a while now – if I should remove the Like button. I will not miss it if WP removes it. And I don’t reblog so I don’t know if I should still keep it.
    I also remember the first time I received a ‘like’. It made me happy that someone liked it or read it.
    I ‘liked’ the post because I have read it and it resonated with me. Even if it is about loss/death, I ‘liked’ it because I feel their pain. When I don’t have time to leave meaningful comments, I will like their posts.

    1. If you remove the ‘like’ button, the ‘reblog’ button will also be removed from all your posts, Carmen. That means nobody will be able to reblog any of your posts, although they can still use the ‘Press This’ button to share your posts.

      It’s interesting what you say about why you will still ‘like’ a post even if you don’t leave a comment or if it didn’t really resonate with you. Have you thought about other ways you can support the blogger rather than by just clicking the ‘like’ button?

  37. I have fallen prey to that click happy like game in the past too.
    It gets much harder to stop once it becomes a habit.
    I read a lot of posts. And like what I’ve read. And comment where I feel moved to.
    😊

    1. I’m glad you only comment where you feel ‘moved to,’ Ritu. And I’m happy that there are now two of us who have admitted playing the click-happy ‘like’ game. I wonder how many other people will join us in the ‘click-happy ‘like’ boat?

  38. I couldn’t resist pressing the ‘Like’ button.

    I prefer comments to any statistic. I also like sharing posts / having posts shared on social media. Sometimes, the comments are a giveaway that the person did NOT read what I’ve written, but I get that. People skim, people stop halfway, but I appreciate the encouragement. I keep trying to write the post everyone is driven to read to the end !

    Thanks Hugh for some interesting food for thought.

  39. Sometimes I liked and I never read it , automatically it’s liked ! I have unfollowed them, what purpose for me to follow then they have an app that automatically likes their post?!

    1. I’ve never heard of being able to automatically ‘like’ a post without pressing the like button. If there is an app that automatically ‘likes’ a post that every reader clicks on, it should be deleted. You do well by unfollowing those blogs where it does happen. So far, I’ve not come across any blogs where it happens. I will keep a lookout for them, though.

      1. It’s been happening a lot lately, I’m assuming that if you follow it and it’s an external app it automatically will like your post. This is happened on new followers only…

        1. So it’s the ‘App’ that has followed you and ‘liked’ your posts? I wonder if this could be one of those robot accounts often seen on social media? No person there, just some software that somebody has put there. They’re usually fake accounts and often get removed on social media.

        2. No someone has apps that share their posts on social media – I’m wondering if the app usually makes as liked or read because it’s has my blog on file.

        3. All my blog posts are shared straight away to Twitter. It’s something all WordPress bloggers can do on their blog. WordPress makes it very easy for bloggers to share their posts directly to their social media accounts. I’ve checked, and I don’t see any ‘likes’ from me on my own posts. I also share the posts that I have enjoyed reading of other bloggers on Twitter. Other bloggers also share my posts on social media. It’s a great way of supporting each other. However, I only share the posts I have read and ‘liked.’

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.