Another Walk With Toby

Hello, welcome to my second post.  I’ve managed to get access to the computer while Hugh is out of the house.  For those of you that have not read my first post, then you can read it by clicking here.

Oh, this is me, by the way.  My name is Toby and I’m a Cardigan Welsh Corgi.  There were only 99 of us born in the UK last year.  Corgis that is, not dogs with the name Toby!

Hi, I'm Toby
Hello, I’m Toby. Pleased to meet you.

For my second walk, I am going to take you on a walk around Corfe Castle.  The castle is now owned by the National Trust here in the UK and building started way back in 1086 when William the Conqueror swapped a church in Gillingham for the land where the castle was built.

As you can see from the pictures, the castle is now a ruin.

Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle

 

 

 

 

 

However, we were allowed to walk inside the castle and check out its interior which was full of history.

In 1106, Henry the First fought a battle with his older brother, Robert of Normandy and ended up locking Robert up, in the Keep of the castle.

Between 1199 and 1214, King John imprisoned his French niece, Princess Eleanor of Brittany, at the castle.  She survived, but 22 of her knights were not so lucky.  I wonder if any of them were subjected to this device?

Gallow Torture Device
Gallo Torture Device

Between 1220 and 1294, Henry III and Edward the First made many home improvements and modernised the defences of the castle while the inhabitants went about their daily lives.

The last royal owner of the castle was Queen Elizabeth the First who sold it to one of her favourites, Sir Christopher Hatton.  It was not until 1635 that the castle was sold again to the Lord Chief Justice, Sir John Bankes.  He and his family stayed true to King Charles during the Civil War, while the opposing Parliamentary forces held almost all of Dorset, where Corfe Castle is located.

Here’s a couple more pictures, before we carry on the walk.

The walk up to Corfe Castle
The walk up to Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Inside Corfe Castle
Inside Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle Village
Corfe Castle Village

That last picture is of the village of Corfe Castle taken from the top of the castle. It’s a beautiful village with lots of quaint shops and cafes.

 

OK, back to the history lesson.  Between 1643 and 1646, under the command of Dame Mary Bankes, Corfe Castle twice held off sieges in the Civil War.  It was finally captured because of treachery from within its walls.  The castle was then partially demolished and looted by order of Parliament but remained in the ownership of the Bankes family until 1982, when it was given to the National Trust by the family.  What a wonderful gift to the people of the UK.

We had a wonderful time exploring the castle and taking in all the history.  I must say that I felt quite at home what with being a Corgi and walking around a castle.

I hope you enjoyed the walk with me.  I’ll finish off with a few more pictures before I say goodbye, as I can see Hugh on his way back to the house, so I better pretend to be asleep when he gets in.  Until next time.

Where's the roof gone?
Where’s the roof gone?
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
View to the village of Corfe Castle
View to the village of Corfe Castle

© Copyright-All rights reserved-hughsviewsandnews.wordpress.com-July 15, 2014.

26 thoughts

    1. Ahh, yes, Pembrokeshire Corgis are my cousins. Of course they are very well known over here, because Queen Elizabeth II has always owned them. People often think I can’t be a Corgi, because I’m not the same colour as the Pembrokeshire. My owner Hugh often gets asked “what’s your dog a cross between?” Maybe one day you will get another Corgi? If so, why not try one of me instead 🙂

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    1. That sounds a great idea to me, I’d love to as I so much enjoy my walks. We will be in Wales again soon. Thanks for joining me on my walk in Corfe Castle. Perhaps my next post can be about the walk we take in Wales.

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  1. Oh Toby … what a beautiful walk you have taken us on! I love the picture of Corfe Castle Village. You have so many lovely places in the English countryside. I’ll bet you had fun investigating all the corners of the castle and the weather looks great, too.

    You look adorable in your photo, Toby. I hope Hugh lets you write more posts. I’m glad you managed to get your paws on the computer. 🙂

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  2. Toby must have had a ball, figuratively speaking, with all the ancient and modern smells mingling in the Corfe Castle ruins. Hugh, thanks for sharing this story and the photographs; I don’t get to see too many bicolour cardigan corgis here in the U.S.

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    1. Thanks, Leigh. I understand Cardigan Corgis are more popular in the States than they are over here in the UK. Since we had Toby, we have only ever encountered two others. We have met a few Pembrokeshire corgis (cousin of the Cardigan Corgi) but even they are quite rare.

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      1. That’s interesting to know. I guess I just don’t get out much (or have forgotten)! 🙂 I don’t remember seeing a black-and-white cardigan over here (I worked/volunteered in a couple animal shelters, too). Toby’s adorable, and I bet a good walking companion.

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      2. He is indeed. He gets lots of attention when we are out walking, although being a Corgi he can be quite stubborn sometimes. Even waving a treat around won’t get him to come back to me sometimes. The photo’s make him look black & white but his actual colouring is brindle. Over here they come in five different colours, whereas I believe the Pembrokeshire only comes in the one colour of tan.

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